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Full text of "Poland Russia and Great Britain 1941-1945"

Britain and that whole array of those millions who joined the Great
Alliance were campaigning. The rights of a nation to have a government
which was the embodiment of its will, had been trampled under-foot,
" Don Quixote remarked to Sancho Panza " wrote Alastair Forbes in
Daily Mai! " that even among brigands the virtues of justice were found
indispensable, but that was before the days of the Big Three. ..."
The Big Three were admitting the necessity of having in Poland, one of
the most democratic countries of the world, a government which would
accept their dictation, and thereby formally, at any rate, release those
concerned from their commitments. To this end the rights of the Polish
people to create their own government had been usurped by three men—
a Russian, a Briton and an American. For this purpose they established
a commission in the Russian capital headed by the Russian Foreign
Commissar, the man who had already once signed the partition of Poland
with the Soviets' ex-partner Germany.
In the eighteenth century the last of the Polish Kings, Stanislas August,
had been forced on Poland by a similar commission, composed of Catherine
the Second, and her lieutenants—he died an exile in the Tsarist
capital. . . .
When in 1943, the Moscow 4 Union of Patriots *, had tried to usurp
the sovereign rights of the Polish Government, it was clear that only the
Soviets could be held responsible for these moves, but in this latest
development the responsibility was also shown to rest with the two
other Powers. Hitler, who after conquering any country placed its
rulers in chains and appointed a Quisling government, or as in Poland,
just a gauleiter, appeared a mere simpleton in comparison with the inventor
of this masterpiece of power politics at the Crimea, where in all solemnity
it was decided to form a government for the weaker Ally. It was a triumph
of the thesis of the Soviets, which laid down that any government who
could not defend its rights with weapons, should be overpowered.
The Crimea Conference put the final screw in the coffin of the Atlantic
Charter, the source of hope and inspiration to the peoples of the world.
Thirty nations believing in the commitments given to mankind in this
Charter had supported the Great Alliance. From the Declaration at
Yalta, they now learned that the Atlantic Charter bore no relation to the
reality of the present—it was merely a ' guide', as the British Premier
explained in the House ; they now learned that the leaders of the Atlantic
Democracies were handing to Russia the right to intervene in the internal
affairs of weaker countries, and that in full accord with Russia's wish
they were * considering' what line the Eastern frontier of Poland was
to follow.
Thus three non-European Powers were agreeing on the division and
future of Europe without consulting the people concerned, forcing them
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